Programming Perl

Programming Perl

Programming Perl, 2nd Edition is the authoritative guide to Perl version 5, the scripting utility that has established itself as the programming tool of choice for the World Wide Web, UNIX system administration, and a vast range of other applications. Version 5 of Perl includes object-oriented programming facilities. The book is coauthored by Larry Wall, the creator of Perl.Perl is a language for easily manipulating text, files, and processes. It provides a more concise and readable way to do many jobs that were formerly accomplished (with difficulty) by programming with C or one of the shells. Perl is likely to be available wherever you choose to work. And if it isn’t, you can get it and install it easily and free of charge.This heavily revised second edition of Programming Perl contains a full explanation of the features in Perl version 5.003. Contents include:

  • An introduction to Perl
  • Explanations of the language and its syntax
  • Perl functions
  • Perl library modules
  • The use of references in Perl
  • How to use Perl’s object-oriented features
  • Invocation options for Perl itself, and also for the utilities that come with Perl
  • Other oddments: debugging, common mistakes, efficiency, programming style, distribution and installation of Perl, Perl poetry, and so on.

Details

  • Paperback: 670 pages
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media; 2 edition (October 11, 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1565921496
  • ISBN-13: 978-1565921498
  • Product Dimensions: 7.1 x 2.7 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars See all reviews (315 customer reviews)
Download Now

4 comments

  1. If you’re like me, and you’re shopping for a book, you immediately start reading the negative reviews and work upwards. So I started reading the reviews and read through them all, bought the book despite the many negative, and frankly, snippish comments made by many reviewers and decided that I need to respond.
    Many say that the examples are convoluted, or that he focuses on obscure language references. One says the book starts quickly with a discussion of the splice function. The first mention of splice is on page 355, which I certainly don’t define as ‘quickly’….
    Others say that there are no examples, or they are not explained clearly, but there’s a short sample program right on page 18, and then 4 pages are devoted to analyzing the program and how it works. Further review through the book shows many small examples, especially in the sections that outline the core functions of Perl, and the core modules of Perl.
    Others come here and criticize Perl the language, and use this as a platform for their own advocacy of other languages. This is just silly. If you’re interested in Perl, or you’ve been using Perl and you want to know more, buy this book. In the universe of computer programming, every language choice you make is controversial, and subject to debate, and just because some reviewers do not like Perl the language, it does not mitigate the quality of this book.
    That all being said, and debunking the frankly lousy reviews, I’ll caution that this is NOT for beginning programmers, or people with limited technical knowledge. O’Reilly knows this, and anyone who has read this book should know this too. There is a book called ‘Beginning Perl’, also from O’Reilly, and written by one of the other top minds in Perl.Read more ›

  2. I grew up teething on the trusty C=64, then went on to Q-Basic,Fortran-77 (I’m a mechanical engineer by schooling), and eventuallydabbled quite a bit with ANSI C. Except for a quarter of Fortran incollege, I’ve always been self-taught for computers and programming.I thought that this book would be the place to start my ‘career’ inPerl. Since it is the ‘hot new thing’ (although not that new) and Iam interested in Linux and the Apache web server, learning Perl seemedto be the natural extension. And on almost every FAQ, web site, etcetera about Perl, all speak of ‘THE CAMEL’ as being the bible.
    BOYWAS I WRONG! I am not NEARLY smart enough to learn Perl straightfrom the Camel’s mouth. But that doesn’t mean that this is a terriblebook by any means, not at all. But I quickly jumped back on line hereat Amazon and picked up ‘the Llama’, aka Learning Perl, 2d Edition.Here’s my path to success, being that I wasn’t smart enough to learnfrom this book by itself! hahaha…
    (1) Read ‘Learning Perl’straight through at a leisurely pace. Just get a feel for thelanguage and syntax. (2) Download and install Perl… (3) Read’Learning Perl’ a second time, this time not continuing until yousuccessfully complete the exercises at the end of each chapter. (4)Read ‘Programming Perl’, and when you get to a part that you havetrouble with, refer back to the lessons and examples in theLlama.
    This worked quite well for me, and using the Llama before ANDin conjunction with the Camel seemed to enhance the meaning for me ofboth. My newest endeavor is to work through ‘CGI Programming withPerl’, another O’Reilly animal book (‘the Mouse’? ).
    Overall, thisis what I would term a ‘readable reference’.Read more ›

  3. The book itself, used as a Reference and for mastering Perl, is a five star book. But there are a quite a few disadvantages:
    1. The book is not intended to the ones who have no programming experience at all. The read should be at least an intermediate programmer, because the basic programming concepts of the language (Variables, Subs and etc..) are badly explained.
    2. Because of Perl’s C Like Syntax, it is recommended that the reader will know C, Awk, or Grep and Some experience in the Unix Environment.
    3. The Book itself is badly organized, certain complicated things are shown in examples and explanations, and those things are taught many pages afterwards. For Example: An Example of a perl program is shown on page 10, and that example contains subs and pattern matching, which are taught 100 Pages later!
    These are the 3 Main Disadvantages. For Conclusion, if you’re new to programming, or want to learn Perl easliy, buy “Learning Perl”, but if you’re a somewhat experienced programmer, and want to master Perl, this book is the best one you’ll find for that purpose.

  4. This is an excellent companion to the Learing Perl book (also by O’Reilly). If you are new to Perl like I was not too long ago, then start with the Learning Perl book first before you touch this one.
    This book is intended to serve as a reference as it tackles the more complicated aspects of Perl. If you start learning Perl with this book, then you will find it a very difficult language to graps. However, I do not want to take anything away from this book. This book is fantastic for those who want to dive into Perl a bit more and have passed the beginners level. I purchased both the books and once I had finished reading the Learning Perl book, I started turning to this book to get a better understanding of things, especially regular expressions.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *