Airframe

Airframe

Three passengers are dead. Fifty-six are injured. The interior cabin virtually destroyed. But the pilot manages to land the plane. . . .

At a moment when the issue of safety and death in the skies is paramount in the public mind, a lethal midair disaster aboard a commercial twin-jet airliner bound from Hong Kong to Denver triggers a pressured and frantic investigation.

AIRFRAME is nonstop reading: the extraordinary mixture of super suspense and authentic information on a subject of compelling interest that has been a Crichton landmark since The Andromeda Strain.

Details

  • Hardcover: 351 pages
  • Publisher: Knopf; 1st trade ed edition (November 27, 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0679446486
  • ISBN-13: 978-0679446484
  • Product Dimensions: 6.6 x 1.4 x 9.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars See all reviews (745 customer reviews)
Download Now

5 comments

  1. I am constantly amazed by the breadth of Michael Crichton `s interests and by his remarkable skill in researching his subjects. I also find his indirectly expressed issues of more than passing significance. In Jurassic Park the issue is the arrogance of science in its manipulation of nature and the tendency of Western science to eschew accountability for the spillover costs to society when things go wrong. Airframe is another example of it. Here the issue of the freedom of speech and the lack of accountability of the media, particularly television news, is explored. In a society that has come to stress individual rights, little emphasis has been placed on individual responsibility. In order to be a functional culture, there has to be a balance of both rights and responsibilities. Airframe makes this abundantly clear.
    As so often with Crichton’s central characters, a uniquely placed individual must come to grips with the inherent difficulties of fighting an uphill battle against society’s inertia. The heroine, Casey Singleton, is given the task of deciding how a disasterous air accident happened before a crucial business deal collapses and takes the company she works for and all of its employees down with it. It is by no means clear what is taking place, and ultimately she must come to trust her own personal interpretation of events to bring things to a head.
    The detail is impressive. The characters are well developed and real. The story is riveting and fast paced. A thoroughly enjoyable book.

  2. This is absolutely my favourite book by Michael Crichton. He may have a medical degree, but he writes about journalism, the media and politics with much more insight than the condescending attitudes of his scientist characters. This book is Crichton at his best–backed up, as ever, by extensive research into the topic, a cast of hugely realistic characters to love and love to hate, and, of course, an intriguing mystery thrown in to boot. Casey Singleton is a classic Crichton heroine–world-weary, wise, and an expert in her field, she reminds me of Sarah Harding from “The Lost World”, except Casey has a REAL job. The realism of the plot is one of the main factors in making this one of Crichton’s best books–all of this could really happen. I’ve seen other reviewers bellyache about the mundaneness of the final solution to the aircrash, but isn’t that the most chilling note to the whole plot? Just how easily all this chaos was caused? Sleazy journalists, wise colleagues, a comical team of experts called in to exammine the aircraft, and at the centre of it all Casey Singleton, trying to save the company and at the same time trying to stop herself becoming the scapegoat to be sacrificed to the media: for me, this makes a brilliant novel. The final pages will blur by–and when you sit back with a sigh of relief, the underplayed conclusion to this book behind you, there is the final message: Don’t believe everything you read in the papers. Well, I said it was realistically underplayed, didn’t I?

  3. This was a very enjoyable novel. The trademark punchy Crichton opening scene, around which the entire story revolves , is incredibly exciting. You’ll also get a concentrated class in aviation acronyms. And the thoroughly satisfying “getting even” scene, toward the end, is especially tasty. Once again Mr Crichton gives you the tools to figure out the final revelation, but it will still knock you sideways, because I don’t think you’ll figure it out. The science is fine, and digestible. Once you get into the swing of things (acronym-wise) even the aircraft reports get semi-discernable, and pleasing. I highly recommend this book.

  4. The inner workings of this book are fantastic. Michael Crichton puts us into the Norton Aircraft facilities, with all the political goings on, the backstabbing, the wolves at the gate and now…an air disaster.
    As well as entertaining us, Crichton provides with an education in Public Relations and how the investigative journalism doesn’t care about the truth, unless it suits their entertainment needs (one example is the DC-10 story he puts in).
    I liked the main character who is always on the edge of losing her job. She has a tightrope the size of Dental Floss to work on and timelines that are impossible to meet. That, and the fact that her superiors want her to fail. It was worth the price of the book just to see how she would escape the tomb that others had thrown her in.
    The book is chopped up into days (she has 7 days to figure out what caused a near-fatal problem that caused 3 deaths on a flight.) and that provides good suspense and closure as each section ends.
    I recommend this book to anyone. It is a good read and one of Crichton’s best books.

  5. Wow, now that’s what I call a good, quick read. Michael Crichton just never lets you put down the book. At the end of almost every chapter, he leaves you with a cliffhanger just making you want to turn the page. Airframe was no exception. Airframe is about a commercial airliner and its internal happenings. Casey Singleton, the newly appointed QA director for the builder of the plane, gets the job just in time. En route from Hong Kong to Denver one of her company planes all the sudden jerks out of control. Does TWA Flight 800 ring a bell? Casey must investigate to find out why the plane mysteriously did so and in doing so killed several and injured many others. She encounters many obstacles along the way and has to do and say some things that she wouldn’t normally. Overall all, I thought that Airframe was a very good book. I would recommend it to anyone over the age of 15. If you really want a rush, read it while flying on a plane. That should at least double the value of reading it.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *